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Uchi-te / Oshi-te / Nade-te

Source: Andrew Bowling and John Dunham from "The Way of Qigong" by Kenneth Cohen

Last Updated: August 5, 2005   Return to Reiki in Japan
 

These are 3 techniques that  were Part of the old Usui Reiki Ryoho Okuden level.  We now teach these techniques in our own classes. 

But back in 1999 when we were first hearing about these,  Andrew Bowling saw these names and he thought they looked familiar and looked them up in a Qigong book that he had read called "the Way of Qigong" by Kenneth Cohen.  Andy sent me and some friends this text, adding in the Japanese names from the Reiki page.  What follows are the book's explanations of the 3 techniques - although it is possible they may be slightly modified in the form currently taught by the Gakkai (the original Reiki society). 


(From Andy)
"I have put the following together from a Qi-Gong book. Do they seem familiar?  The bold is the Reiki name you have mentioned; the interpretation I have seen else where and the same names given in the book….The method and names are the same as those given in Reiki Ryoho. This comes from a section titled 'External Qi Healing' EGH ." 
Click here for actual book text. 

 Uchi-te. - Tapping

Tapping means to lightly and rhythmically tap or pat the qi field with either your palm or fingertips. This is useful to relieve stagnation or congestion and to improve circulation, (in Tui-na Chinese Massage tapping is applied directly to the body for the same purpose) The therapist taps with either fingers,palm back of hand side of hand, or fist to produce varying degrees of stimulation.

Oshi-te. - Pushing hand/Pulsing

Pulsing means to ever so slightly open and close the palm. Stretch the fingers and hand open, then relax. Do this repeatedly at a steady pace. the qi is emitted from the centre of the hand. The indications for pulsing are similar to tapping. Stimulates and improves circulation. Pulsing can be used over any area of the body that requires it, including specific acupressure points. If you pulse directly over an acupuncture point, it is easy to feel tingling and warmth at the point or radiating along the meridian. 

Nade-te - Stroking hand/Waving

Waving is very useful for congestion or pain. The fingertips sweep down the patients energy field, as though brushing the pain away. The technique is identical to the 'sweeping' (barrida) practised in Mexican curanderismo healing

These three methods move qi without adding heat or cold. They can be applied by themselves or combined with clockwise or counterclockwise cir-cling. For instance, if the kidneys are weak and deficient, it may be necessary to use gentle pulsing of qi, followed by clockwise circling. If the shoulders are tight, painful, and hot, you can use counterclockwise circling to reduce ten-sion and waving to relieve pain. For an inflamed, sore throat, you may wish to circle counterclockwise over the throat and then sweep the pain away from the body. 
 

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The Actual Book Text

I told my friend John Dunham about Andy's experience and he also remembered reading these techniques, and e-mail me a copy of the book cover and the page containg the text that Andy had found.

262                     The Way of Qigong


digenous people. When I explained to my Cherokee mentor, Keetoowah, about EQH methods, he looked at me in disbelief: "How could Chinese people know about Cherokee medicine?" Keetoowah used to hold his hands in front and back of the patients body, "like two poles of a magnet, the negative and positive." Sometimes he would circle one palm—clockwise to warm the body, counterclockwise to cool it. His other hand was usually pointed toward the ground. 
 

Tapping, Pulsing, Waving

Other effective treatment gestures include Tapping, Pulsing, and Waving. Tapping means to lightly and rhythmically tap or pat the qi field with either your palm or fingertips. This is useful to relieve stagnation or congestion and to improve circulation. In Tui-na, Chinese Massage Therapy, tapping is ap-plied directly to the body for the same purpose. The therapist taps with ei-ther fingers, palm, back of the hand, side of the hand, or fist to produce varying degrees of stimulation.

Pulsing means to ever so slightly open and close the palm. Stretch the fingers and hand open, then let it relax. Do this repeatedly at a steady pace. The qi is emitted from the center of the healers palm. The indications for pulsing are similar to tapping. It stimulates and improves circulation. Pulsing can be used over any area of the body that requires it, including specific acupuncture points. If you pulse directly over an acupuncture point, it is easy to feel tingling and warmth at the point or radiating along the meridian.

Waving is very useful for congestion or pain. The fingertips sweep down the patient's energy field, as though brushing the pain away. The technique is identical to the "Sweeping" (barrida) practiced in Mexican curanderismo healing.

These three methods move qi without adding heat or cold. They can be applied by themselves or combined with clockwise or counterclockwise cir-cling. For instance, if the kidneys are weak and deficient, it may be necessary to use gentle pulsing of qi, followed by clockwise circling. If the shoulders are tight, painful, and hot, you can use counterclockwise circling to reduce ten-sion and waving to relieve pain. For an inflamed, sore throat, you may wish to circle counterclockwise over the throat and then sweep the pain away from the body.
 

Hand Position

Usually the entire open hand is used to transmit qi. Qi is emitted from the fingers and palm over a broad area. To intensify the "qi beam," emit qi from

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